Bringing it home: community survey of HIV risks to primary sex partners of men and women in alcohol-serving establishments in Cape Town, South Africa

by:Y&M Crafts     2019-09-12
Background concurrent sexual relations promote the spread of HIV infection and have sex with non-HIV-infected persons
Primary partners may pose a particularly high risk of spreading HIV to primary partners.
Purpose: We checked sex and alcohol
In informal drinking establishments, the risks associated with sexual partners between men and women in South Africa, in addition to the main relationship. Methods Men (n=4959)and women (n=2367)
Major sexual partners living in Xhosa-
The township of South Africa completed an anonymous investigation.
Logistic regression tests the association between the risk of having an external partner and a sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV. Results Forty-
Last month, 4% of men and 26% of women had major sexual partners.
The use of condoms between men and women and external partners was inconsistent;
Only 19% of men and 12% of women use condoms in line with outside sexual partners.
Multivariate regression of men and women showed that there were external partners associated with the diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections, higher frequency and number of alcohol consumption, significant alcohol consumption during sexual life, and meeting sexual partners in alcohol
The ratio of places of service to unprotected sex is high.
Conclusion among female customers in South Africa, external sexual partners are associated with multiple HIV infection risk factors.
Social and structural interventions that encourage the use of condoms are necessary for men and women with external partners --serving venues.
Background simultaneous sexual relations contribute to the spread of HIV infection and sexual relations with non-HIV-infected persons
Primary partners may pose a particularly high risk of spreading HIV to primary partners.
Purpose: We checked sex and alcohol
In informal drinking establishments, the risks associated with sexual partners between men and women in South Africa, in addition to the main relationship. Methods Men (n=4959)and women (n=2367)
Major sexual partners living in Xhosa-
The township of South Africa completed an anonymous investigation.
Logistic regression tests the association between the risk of having an external partner and a sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV.
Results Forty-
Last month, 4% of men and 26% of women had major sexual partners.
The use of condoms between men and women and external partners was inconsistent;
Only 19% of men and 12% of women use condoms in line with outside sexual partners.
Multivariate regression of men and women showed that there were external partners associated with the diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections, higher frequency and number of alcohol consumption, significant alcohol consumption during sexual life, and meeting sexual partners in alcohol
The ratio of places of service to unprotected sex is high.
Conclusion among female customers in South Africa, external sexual partners are associated with multiple HIV infection risk factors.
Social and structural interventions that encourage the use of condoms are necessary for men and women with external partners --serving venues.
Throughout southern Africa, a number of countries have established a broad HIV epidemic.
Multi-sex partnerships contribute to the rapid spread of HIV infection and have the potential to expand the prevalence of the epidemic.
1 Mathematical models show that sexual relationships that overlap in time, or partnerships that exist at the same time, especially the high risk of HIV transmission.
2-4 of particular importance to HIV transmission is that the primary sexual partner of individuals who also have external partners may be at risk.
Research in Uganda shows that men are more common external partners than women, and the HIV status of external partners is often unknown.
Research on 15-29year-
Elderly people in Kenya found that 11% of married men and 3% of married women had opposite sex partners.
Six studies have shown that the spread of HIV occurs in committed relationships and that access to relationships through a third person may pose a risk to major partners.
7. estimates suggest that up to half of all HIV infections in Africa are likely to occur at a stable Primary stage --
Cooperative relations.
The risk of the primary partner may be further expanded, as the continued use of condoms is not common in the primary relationship.
South Africa is one of the most prevalent countries in the world, however, only 15% of men and 18% of women report that condom use is consistent and even occasional.
However, the use of condoms with external partners may offset the risk of major partners.
There is evidence that men with external partners use condoms more frequently in their initial relationships than men.
However, the difference in condom use between primary and non-primary levels is not clear
Key partners
Informal drinking places (ie, shebeens)
Sex risk is important in cities and towns.
In South Africa, most female customers encounter sexual partners in drinking places.
11. 12 meeting with a sexual partner in shebeens was associated with a higher rate of having multiple partners and unprotected sex.
Therefore, 13 or 14 drinking places can be used as high-
Risk networks and the public.
Because alcohol use reliably predicts inconsistent condom use, the risk to major partners can also be higher among shebeens who drink and have an external partner.
As far as we know, there has been no previous study on the use of condoms in an alcoholic environment
It serves venues in southern Africa.
We reported an anonymous location. based cross-
A segmented survey of men and women who drink alcohol in current major relationships in shebeens, South Africa.
Our focus is on sexual behavior and condom use in major and external partnerships.
In addition, we compare sexual risk and protective behavior between people who have a primary partner and an external partner and those who have a full primary partner.
We assume that people with external sexual partners will show higher sexual risks, including unprotected sex and higher alcohol use during sexual activity.
The survey targets 7326 residents (
4959 males and 2367 females)
Of the three main 10 parts of Xhosa
Speaking town just outside Cape Town, South Africa.
All participants are 18 years of age or older (
Median = 30, IQR 50). Nearly all (98%)
Of the participants identified as black Africans, 51% were unemployed and 50% were not enrolled.
The townships participating in the current study are located 20 kilometres from the Cape Town Central Business District.
The residents are mainly Xhosa cultural heritage.
The community is defined as having at least one informal area with an area of about 10 kilometres.
We used methods described by Weir et al for rapid community assessment and identified 10 shebeens at least 1 kilometer apart from each other.
We chose shebeens who serve at least 75 customers a week.
The field staff who conducted the survey were eight Aboriginal men and women from communities similar to our selected townships who spoke Xhosa and English.
Contact the participants individually and ask them to complete the anonymous survey.
All men and women aged 18 and over are eligible for the study.
The underground bar where the participants conducted the investigation (84%)
On a nearby street16%)
Alcohol of choice-
Service Organization.
All participants surveyed outside the venue said they did drink at a bar last month.
Participants who agree (95%)
Got a 9-page self-
Anonymous survey that takes 15-20 min to complete.
Participants were compensated for the keychain or shopping bag for taking the time to complete the survey.
The survey was printed in English and Xhosa.
In order to avoid collecting the names of participants at any time, verbal consent was obtained.
On-site staff provide assistance to participants when needed (
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